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AA, NA and Al-Anon Meetings in Sandy, Utah

“As we fought [addiction] together, we got to a point where we felt so alone and didn’t realize what resources were available to us” - Mark, Sandy, UT Resident

A few years back, Andrea Smardon published an article on the WKUER website profiling Mark Lewis, a local resident who lost his son to heroin addiction. Mark is among the many people who believe that there needs to be a larger network of addiction resources in Sandy, Utah.

“It’s amazing to me, after [his son] died, how many people I’ve talked to who say they’ve been affected with their family, friends, niece or nephew, but nobody seems to talk about it,” Mark is quoted in the article. “We’ve learned there are a lot of people working on the problem, but there’s still a lack of awareness by those who can make a difference and we want to get the conversation started.”

Mark is absolutely right. There is a shortage of resources for addicts in Sandy, Utah, and the country as a whole.

That’s why we here at Northpoint Recovery are committed to helping addicts overcome their struggles. While it may take years before there are sufficient addiction resources, there are a few that can help you get started right now.

Here’s some info about AA, NA and Al-Anon (as well as a list of meetings in the area) that should be helpful for you.

Do You Have Questions About Addiction? Call Our Recovery Experts Now.

AA Meetings: Battling Alcoholism in Utah

Alcoholism is a rampant problem in both Sandy and other communities around Utah. This often comes as a surprise, given the fact that the state has such a large Mormon population and unusually strict liquor laws. Practitioners of the Mormon religion, of course, are supposed to abstain from drinking booze and using drugs. But, both Mormons and non-Mormons are still susceptible to alcohol abuse and addiction.

Here are a few statistics about alcohol abuse in the area:

  • Alcohol poisoning is a large problem in Utah. the state has the seventh-highest rate of deaths related to binge-drinking. That is quite a scary statistic, considering that only 25% of the state’s population admit to using alcohol.
  • 72% of all teens who use alcohol in the state admit to binge drinking on a regular basis. On a national level, only 55% of teenage drinkers report binge-drinking, putting Utah teens 17% above the U.S average.
  • Although fewer adult residents are drinkers, alcoholism rates in Utah are on a par with the rest of the country.
  • A recent study on DUI statistics in Utah shows that fewer alcohol-related car accidents take place in the state than in other parts of the country. This leads researchers to believe that the majority of residents’ binge-drinking takes place at home.

These statistics are overwhelming,  but there are many resources to help alcoholics and their families. Alcoholics Anonymous is a free and easy way to start tackling your problem.

Sandy Resources

Alcoholics Anonymous: A Community of Recovering Addicts

If you’re a Utah resident and you’re struggling with alcoholism, it’s important to remind yourself that you’re not alone. There are hundreds of thousands of Utahns like you who are struggling with the same problem.

AA meetings are a place where alcoholics gather to offer one another support. Members get together in a designated meeting place (usually a school, library, town hall or church). They take turns sharing their stories and talking about their experience with recovery.

There is no prerequisite for membership. All you need to do to be a member is to show up, listen (you don’t even have to talk if you don’t want to) and have the desire to not drink.

“There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about his or her drinking problem.” - Alcoholics Anonymous, What is AA?

Are you an alcoholic? Take one of our free alcoholism quizzes:

Alcohol Addiction Quiz

Am I a Functional Alcoholic?

Do I Need Rehab?

Meetings are held every day of the week both in nearly every city around the country. You’re not required to attend every meeting, just whenever you feel like you need some support.

Note: Some meetings are labeled “closed”. As we’ve pointed out above, AA is an organization that prides itself on the commitment of its members. Closed meetings, therefore, are only open to addicts that have attended multiple public meetings and shown that they are dedicated to getting sober.

It doesn’t take long for the community to recognize that you are actively working to get sober. After attending a few open meetings, you should talk to the organizer about joining a closed meeting and they’ll instruct you on the next steps to take.

Sunday

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian Church
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Monday

7:30 PM
Into Action Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian Church
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is a step-study meeting group. Members will gather to discuss their 12-step progress and share advice on working through the process.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Tuesday

7:00 PM
South Enders Group
Alta Canyon Baptist Church
Basement
11194 S. 1000 E. Street
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Wednesday

12:00 Noon
South Valley Lunch Group
Jim’s Family Restaurant
10640 Holiday Park Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

7:00 PM
Draper Group
Jim’s Family Restaurant
10640 Holiday Park Drive
Sandy, UT 84070
This is an open meeting.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Thursday

6:30 PM
BBT & T Group
Alta Canyon Baptist Church
11194 S. 1000 E. Street
Sandy, UT 84094
This is a closed, 12x12 Big Book study group.

7:00 PM
Women’s Study Group
Healthsouth Rehab Hospital
8074 S. 1300 E.
Sandy, UT 84094
This is a closed, 12 x 12 Big Book study group. Open to women only.

7:30 PM
Grapevine Group
Hilltop Methodist Church
985 E. 106000 S.
Sandy, UT 84094
This is a closed meeting.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Friday

12:00 Noon
Weekend Warriors Group
Jim’s Family Restaurant
10640 Holiday Park Drive
Sandy, UT 84070
This is an open meeting.

8:00 PM
No Nonsense Group
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
8575 S. 700 E.
Sandy, UT 84070
This is a closed meeting.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093
This is an open meeting.

Saturday

5:00 PM
No Nonsense Group
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church
8575 S. 700 E.
Sandy, UT 84070
This is a Big Book study meeting. Each meeting is focused around a specific chapter or section of the organization’s official book.

9:00 PM
Every Night Firelight Group
Community of Grace Presbyterian
Room 8
2015 S. 2000 E Highland Drive
Sandy, UT 84093

This is an open meeting.

Important note: New AA meetings are popping up all of the time. Likewise, there is always a chance that a meeting will be canceled or that the location will move.

For the most up-to-date meeting schedules (or to find one in a nearby city), check out the official Alcoholics Anonymous website. The organization has a fantastic search engine that will give you the most recent updates on meetings and resources.

Worried about attending a meeting? Fear that people will judge you, look down upon you or just downright reject you?

Don’t worry!

Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are a place designed for addicts to go and feel safe. Everyone in the room will be someone who has either struggled or is currently struggling with a drinking.

In each meeting, there will be people who’ve lost jobs, family members, hurt other people and all but killed themselves in their life as an addict. No matter what your addiction has caused you to do, there will be someone in attendance who can relate.

“It is one of the most beautiful compensations in this life, that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson, Author

Every meeting is different. Some are large group discussions where each addict who feels the need to speak can stand up and share their story. Other meetings are smaller and more intimate, giving everyone the opportunity to get to know one another. You may need to “shop around” until you find the type of meeting that works best for you.

After a while, you’re likely to find that you enjoy all types of meetings, no matter the venue or size of the crowd. Many of the organization’s members find themselves returning to meeting for years after they’ve gotten sober. Some members even consider themselves “lifers” and attend local meetings for as long as they’re physically capable.

The Latest Recovery News and Stories

Read great recovery stories, learn about the latest treatments, and find out how addiction affects yourself and your loved ones in our blog.

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NA Meetings: A Network of People Fighting Drug Addiction

Utah may not be the state you think of when we talk about the opioid crisis in America. Similar to alcohol, the state’s large Mormon population is forbidden from using drugs by their religion. This does not mean, however, that heroin, meth, and prescription pills aren’t causing damage in the lives of thousands of Utah residents.

In fact, opiate addiction (as well as drug addiction in general) are a large problem for the state.

Here are some facts concerning drug addiction in Utah:

  • More than 1,400 Utah residents died of drug overdoses in 2015. This number does not account for those who survived overdoses or faced life-threatening health consequences due to drug use.
  • Since the year 2000, prescription drug overdose rates have increased more than 400%.
  • Between the years 2013 and 2015, it ranked fifth-highest on the list of drug overdose deaths by state. Currently, it ranks at #8.
  • Salt Lake County sees a large percentage of the overdose deaths that occur in the state each year.
  • Each year, roughly 80 Utah residents die in drug-related car accidents. This is far below the national average but is still a number that we should work to decrease.

Fortunately, there are a number of addiction resources for drug addictions in Utah. The Narcotics Anonymous meetings held in Sandy and surrounding cities are a great place to start.

Similar to Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous is an organization that helps drug addcits.

NA caters to those addicted to drugs such as heroin, methamphetamine, prescription opioids and cocaine. Even those folks who are dependent on marijuana are welcomed at these meetings.

NA meetings in Sandy, as well as other cities around the world, do not discriminate based on your substance of choice. It’s more important that you are willing to acknowledge your problem and work toward overcoming it.

The organization’s meetings are free and open to the public. If you’re struggling with a drug abuse habit, you should consider attending one.

“I learned that I could have fun, laugh and cry with amazing people and not be on drugs.” - Stevie Nicks

Are you an addict? Take one of our free online assessments:

Drug Addiction Quiz

Heroin Addiction Quiz

Cocaine Addiction Quiz

Crystal Meth Addiction Quiz

Prescription Drug Addiction Quiz

Sunday

1:30 PM
Back to Basics
Mountain Vista Methodist Church
8931 S. 3200 W.
West Jordan, UT 84088
This is an open meeting.

7:00 PM
Recovery Rockstars
Mountain Vista Methodist Church
8931 S. 3200 W.
West Jordan, UT 84088
This is an open meeting.

8:00 PM
Unconditional Love Group
Fellowship Hall
2090 S. Windsor St.
Salt Lake City, UT 84106
This is an open meeting.

Monday

6:30 PM
Living the Promise
FCR Church (Building behind the church)
859 S. 800 E.
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
This is an open meeting.

8:00 PM
Principles of Recovery
Mountain Vista Methodist Church
8931 S. 3200 W.
West Jordan, UT 84088
This is an open meeting.

Tuesday

7:00 PM
Pride in Recovery
USARA
Suite 200 Upstairs
180 E. 2100 S.
South Salt Lake, UT 84115
This is an open meeting for LGBTQ addicts.

7:30 PM
Stepping Stones
Trinity United Methodist Church
4290 W. 5415 S.
Kearns, UT 84118
This is an open meeting.

8:30 PM
Centered in Recovery
Episcopal Church
1131 S. Main St.
Centerville, UT 04014
This is an open meeting.

Wednesday

6:30 PM
Living the Promise
Mountain Vista Methodist Church
8931 S. 3200 W.
West Jordan, UT 84088
This is an open meeting.

6:30 PM
Never Alone
Alano Club
5056 Commerce Drive
Murray, UT 84107
This is an open meeting.

7:00 PM
New Beginnings
Trinity United Methodist Church
4290 W. 5415 S.
Kearns, UT 84118
This is an open meeting.

Thursday

7:00 PM
Clean and Serene
Red Eye Coffee
7301 South 900 E.
Midvale, UT 84047
This is an open meeting.

8:00 PM
H.O.P.E
First United Methodist Church
203 S. 200 E.
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
This is an open meeting.

7:15 PM
Round Table Sharing & Caring
Trinity United Methodist Church
4290 W. 5415 S.
Kearns, UT 84118
This is an open meeting.

Friday

6:30 PM
Second Chance
Alano Club
1120 W. Utah Ave.
Tooele, UT 84074
This is an open meeting.

9:00 PM
Niner
Mount Tabor Lutheran Church
175 S. 700 E.
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
This is an open meeting

Saturday

12:30 PM
Women’s Pick A Stick
Alano Club
5056 Commerce Drive
Murray, UT 84107
This is an open, women’s only meeting.

7:00 PM
Saturday Night Live
All Saints Episcopal Church
1700 S. Foothill Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
This is an open, step study meeting. Members convene to discuss their progress in the 12 steps.

8:30 PM
New Found Realities
All Saints Episcopal Church
1700 S. Foothill Drive
Salt Lake City, UT 84108

This is an open meeting.

Important note: This is by no means an exhaustive list of NA meetings in the Sandy area. There are a number of different meetings held in the SLC area (as well as the rest of Utah) day of the week.

For a more complete, up-to-date list of meetings, head on over to the official Narcotics Anonymous website. There, you’ll find a full search engine that allows for you to browse meetings by city, state, day of the week and meeting style.

In the words of the organization, these meetings “give members a place to share recovery with other addicts.”

Every day of the year, millions of addicts around the world take advantage of the benefits that the organization offers, convening everywhere from restaurants to church basements to connect with other addicts.

“NA’s primary approach to recovery is based on the therapeutic value of one addict helping another.” - Narcotics Anonymous, About Us

Each meeting is different. Some are large. Some are small. Some are open-discussion and others are based around “The Big Book”, the primary text used in 12-step programs. People who attend Big Book meetings will each speak (and/or listen to others speak) about how the selected chapter impacted their recovery.

In most meetings members will take turns talking about their experience with drugs. How addiction affected their life, why they decided to get better and what types of progress they’re making.

Meetings are relatively informal and no addict should ever be afraid to attend one. In the words of one recently recovered addict, “The people I’ve met through NA are like the family I never had.”

Al-Anon Meetings: Helping Families to Overcome Addiction

Addicts aren’t the only ones affected by addiction. Oftentimes, the addict’s habit can take a serious toll on the physical or psychological well-being of their family members. Children, parents, siblings, spouses and even close friends of addicts often need emotional support.

Given that drug and alcohol problems are so prevalent in the mountain region, it’s easy to imagine that there are a lot of individuals out there who have a close relationship with an addict.

Al-Anon is a resource that allows these individuals to meet up and offer support for one another. Members gather to hear the stories of other people who’ve lived through the same situation and to provide advice wherever they can.

If you’re the family member of an alcoholic or addict, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • You didn’t cause the addiction. You are in no way responsible for the decisions of another person.
  • You have no control over your loved one. If they desire to drink or use drugs, they’ll continue to do so no matter what you say.
  • You can’t cure their problem. In order for the addict to move beyond their addiction, they’ll need to admit to themselves that they have a problem and seek help on their own.

These can be difficult things to admit to ourselves. By meeting with other members of the organization on a regular basis, however, it is easier to come to terms with these difficult realities.

“The worst thing is watching someone drown and not being able to convince them that they can save themselves by just standing up.” - Anonymous

Is your family member a drug addict? Take our online assessment:

Family Member Addiction Quiz
Codependent Quiz

As the opioid and alcohol problems grow worse in America, this organization has become increasingly popular. Every day of the week, the family members of addicts gather to connect with other people that understand what they’re living through.

Sunday

5:00 PM
Tooele Choices 4 U
Faith Mountain Lutheran Church
560 S. Main
Tooele, UT 84074
This is an open meeting.

6:00 PM
Many Paths
Creekside Christian Fellowship Church
1400 Bitner Rd.
Park City, UT 84098
This is an open meeting.

Monday

11:00 AM
Monday Miracles
Holladay United Church of Christ
2631 E. Murray-Holladay Rd.
Holladay, UT 84117
This is an open, 90-minute meeting.

6:30 PM
Living & Learning in Al-Anon
St. James Episcopal Church
7486 S. Union Park Ave.
Midvale, UT 84047
This is an open meeting. It caters specifically to beginners and first-timers.

Tuesday

5:30 PM
New Beginnings
Magna Alano West
9100 W. Main St.
Magna, UT 84044
This is an open meeting. Enter through the basement on the west side of the building.

7:00 PM
Bountiful Step-by-Step
Backstreet Club
25 N. 200 We.
Bountiful, UT 84010
This is an open meeting. Attendees will discuss the 12-steps and talk about their progress in the program.

Wednesday

11:00 AM
My Hoop
Pioneer Museum
47 E. Vine St.
Tooele, UT 84074
This is an open meeting.

7:00 PM
Serenity Seekers
Avalon West
6246 S. Redwood Rd.
West Valley City, UT 84123
This is an open meeting.

Thursday

1:15 PM
Is Al-Anon for You?
Alano Club
5056 S. 300 W.
Murray, UT 84107
This is an open, 90-minute meeting.

7:00 PM
Bountiful Easy Does It
Bountiful Community Church
150 N. 400 E.
Bountiful, UT 84010

Friday

7:00 PM
Friday Night Serenity
Miss Swendy’s Day School
2722 W. Brewer Circle
West Jordan, UT 84084

7:30 PM
Couples in Sobriety
All Saints Episcopal Church
1710 S. Foothill St.
Salt Lake City, UT 84108
This is an open meeting for couples who are working to overcome the side effects of addiction. Enter from the west side of the building.

Saturday

9:30 AM
Saturday Serenity
Saddle View Office Park
Building B
2200 Park Ave.
Park City, UT 84060
This is an open meeting. The meeting is held in the basement.

5:30 PM
Saturday Step
Friendship Manor
Level A Boardroom
1320 E. 500 S.
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
This is an open meeting. Attendees will discuss their progress in the 12-step process.

Important note: There are numerous Al-Anon meetings held around the state on a daily basis. If you’re looking for additional meetings around the state, check out the official Utah Al-Anon website for a complete list.

Membership is open to anyone that feels overwhelmed by the addiction of someone else. This includes people from all different socioeconomic classes, races, religions, genders, and ages.

The only requirement for membership is an open mind and a willingness to listen. No matter what your situation is, the group will be receptive to your presence and eager to help you cope with your burden.

What are the 12-Steps, Anyway?

As you’ve probably noticed, the three programs described above are all based around the 12-Steps. Don’t understand what that means? Let us explain.

The 12-Steps are a systematic approach to sobriety developed by Bill W, the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous. Bill believed that by working through a series of benchmarks, or milestones, addicts could build the psychological strength necessary to stay sober. Each of these steps can be quite difficult but are shown to be very helpful for people who can’t seem to quit using.

The steps are slightly different in AA and NA than they are in Al-Anon. However, all three of these programs has similar goals and, therefore, the steps are mostly the same. They are:

  • Admit that you are powerless over a substance
  • Understand that a power greater than yourself can help you to see your situation clearly
  • Give yourself over to that higher power
  • Take a “fearless” inventory of your beliefs, your morals, your choices and your past actions
  • Admit to yourself, your higher power and another person everything you’ve done wrong in life
  • Admit that you want to become a better person and strive to make better decisions in the future
  • Ask your higher power to help you be a better person
  • Make a list of everyone who you’ve mistreated and become willing to make amends with them
  • Make amends with all of the people who you’ve mistreated
  • Continue to take a personal inventory and admit when you are wrong
  • Pray to your higher power* on a regular basis.
  • Embrace the spiritual awakening that you achieve through the Steps and work to help other addicts in their struggle

*The terms “higher power” and “pray” are loose in this context. You are not obligated to practice any type of religion if you choose not to. A higher power can be anything that gives you the strength and incentive to live life as a decent person.

Are You Addicted? Take a Quiz

Take one of our addiction quizzes to find out if you or someone you care about needs help today.

Are You A Sandy Resident Struggling with Addiction Issues?

If you live in Utah and you’re battling an addiction, we’d love to hear from you. We’ve been we’ve been lucky enough to help hundreds of Utahns just like you in their fight against drugs and alcohol. Although our facility is located in Idaho, we believe that we can provide you with the time, space and support you need to get sober.

Unfortunately, it may be a bit before the state can provide all of the addiction resources necessary to fight the drug epidemic. In the meantime, a healthy dose of detox, rehab and a 12-step program like AA or NA can work to get you on the path to a healthy life.

Please give us a call today. We’re excited to help you get clean.

or

Level A Boardroom
1320 E. 500 S.
Salt Lake City, UT 84102
This is an open meeting. Attendees will discuss their progress in the 12-step process.

Important note: There are numerous Al-Anon meetings held around the state on a daily basis. If you’re looking for additional meetings around the state, check out the official Utah Al-Anon website for a complete list.

Who Attends Al-Anon Meetings?

Membership is open to anyone that feels overwhelmed by the addiction of someone else. This includes people from all different socioeconomic classes, races, religions, genders, and ages.

The only requirement for membership is an open mind and a willingness to listen. No matter what your situation is, the group will be receptive to your presence and eager to help you cope with your burden.

What are the 12-Steps, Anyway?

As you’ve probably noticed, the three programs described above are all based around the 12-Steps. Don’t understand what that means? Let us explain.

The 12-Steps are a systematic approach to sobriety developed by Bill W, the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous. Bill believed that by working through a series of benchmarks, or milestones, addicts could build the psychological strength necessary to stay sober. Each of these steps can be quite difficult but are shown to be very helpful for people who can’t seem to quit using.

The steps are slightly different in AA and NA than they are in Al-Anon. However, all three of these programs has similar goals and, therefore, the steps are mostly the same. They are:

  1. Admit that you are powerless over a substance
  2. Understand that a power greater than yourself can help you to see your situation clearly
  3. Give yourself over to that higher power
  4. Take a “fearless” inventory of your beliefs, your morals, your choices and your past actions
  5. Admit to yourself, your higher power and another person everything you’ve done wrong in life
  6. Admit that you want to become a better person and strive to make better decisions in the future
  7. Ask your higher power to help you be a better person
  8. Make a list of everyone who you’ve mistreated and become willing to make amends with them
  9. Make amends with all of the people who you’ve mistreated
  10. Continue to take a personal inventory and admit when you are wrong
  11. Pray to your higher power* on a regular basis.
  12. Embrace the spiritual awakening that you achieve through the Steps and work to help other addicts in their struggle

*The terms “higher power” and “pray” are loose in this context. You are not obligated to practice any type of religion if you choose not to. A higher power can be anything that gives you the strength and incentive to live life as a decent person.

Are You A Sandy Resident Struggling with Addiction Issues?

If you live in Utah and you’re battling an addiction, we’d love to hear from you. We’ve been we’ve been lucky enough to help hundreds of Utahns just like you in their fight against drugs and alcohol. Although our facility is located in Idaho, we believe that we can provide you with the time, space and support you need to get sober.

Unfortunately, it may be a bit before the state can provide all of the addiction resources necessary to fight the drug epidemic. In the meantime, a healthy dose of detox, rehab and a 12-step program like AA or NA can work to get you on the path to a healthy life.

Please give us a call today. We’re excited to help you get clean.

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